Album Review: WEAK by Terrible As The Dawn

TATD

 

WEAK, the debut EP from Terrible As The Dawn, kicks off with ‘Stains’, a song full of screeched vocals and atonal guitar work that is very reminiscent of the bands I loved (and still do) from the late 90’s/early 2000’s hardcore scene. Especially the ones doing weird stuff, bands like Daughters, Circle Takes The Square, and basically anything on the Three One G label. It’s a sound I adore and was very welcoming upon first listen. In fact, Terrible As The Dawn’s entire sound is a wonderful mishmash of genres I love. Everything from dissonant hardcore to grinding heaviness to indie rock to 80’s goth work together to create a sound that is often times chaotic and spellbinding.
Forming as a way to deal with the stress and emotions of their concurring and separate divorces, Caroline Fukuchi (guitar, vocals) and Stephen Smith (drums, vocals) created a sound that is emotionally brutal. The vocals often sound painful and invoke true emotions as opposed to just screaming for the sake of sounding “heavy”. In fact, WEAK might be one of the most emotionally real and raw albums I’ve ever heard. The interplay of grinding chaos and early Cursive style indie rock works well to counterbalance each other. ‘Dead’, the third song on the album, is the best Cursive song that Tim Kasher never wrote. The spoken word/singing into full blown screech of “all that I want is to find someway…. home!” hits me hard every time I hear it.
The marriage of genres reaches its pinnacle on closing song, ‘Ghosts’. Its fast punk feel crescendos into a heavy and noisy ending that feels cathartic and needed, like something being kept bottled up finally succumbing to the pressure and exploding. It’s my favorite part of the album and a perfect way for the EP to end. It leaves you longing for more.
WEAK is an album designed by conflict. Everything about the music and vocals is epitomized by the idea of conflict. The atonal nature of hardcore fighting against 90’s indie rock. The screeched vocals fighting against the clean singing. It’s all conflict, and conflict is something that is universal. Everyone deals with it and Terrible As The Dawn have recorded the perfect sound to help deal with those feelings of depression and anger that might result from any conflicts that happens in your life.

TATD live

You can pick up a digital copy of WEAK from Terrible As The Dawn’s Bandcamp page HERE!

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Otto’s Band Of The Week

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Hailing from Bombay, India, Death By Fungi play a form of melodic hardcore punk that has completely captured my attention in the last couple months. Taking influences from bands like Shai Hulud, Propagandhi, and some of the more metallic parts of Converge, their four song EP, In Dearth Of, is a scorcher. Featuring fast hardcore riffs and vocals backed by some great metal influenced drumming, In Dearth Of  is young and angry hardcore done right.


“There’s no going back now, we’ve come to far to leave this all behind us”

DBF

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Album Review: A Forest/Siamese Twins by Curezum

Curezum

There are few bands in the world that affect me as much as The Cure. Their songs, even when played by other bands, always hit me very hard. And if you can make one of their songs translate well into metal, you will forever have a place in my heart. Portland, Oregon’s Curezum are one of those bands that have firmly rooted themselves into my chest cavity and permanently set up residence. Following their One Hundred Years/The Top single last year, they’re now back with a new single. This time putting their black metalled twist on A Forest and Siamese Twins.
Now, there have been a lot of covers of A Forest. It’s usually a go to for most metal bands as it’s one of The Cure’s more popular songs and has a dark, goth edge to it. Originally from the Seventeen Seconds album, most bands fail miserably at covering it and it’s a song I’ve been adamant on bands ceasing covers of. Most of the metal covers I’ve heard of A Forest tend to just sound like a band that doesn’t totally like The Cure or maybe are covering it as a “hey! we’re a metal band covering a non-metal song!” scenario. It never works and always feels goofy or forced. Curezum on the other hand have absolutely crushed it. Their version has such an attention to detail and true love for the original that it shows in their work. The underlying bass and drums (Billy Anderson and Martti Hill, respectively) work incredibly well playing that all too familiar backbone to the song all while remaining heavy, even incorporating some blast beats into the mix. The guitars (Mort Subite) are incredible at their balance of playing fast and heavy while maintaining the melody and overall goth tone of the original. Everything crescendo’s perfectly into the “and again and again and again and again” part towards the end. It’s so satisfying. Curezum may have made me change my mind on metal covers of A Forest, at least until I hear another terrible power metal version.
The B-side song, Siamese Twins from the Pornography album, is hands down the best thing Curezum has done so far. The first time I listened to it, I couldn’t stop smiling. I really love that both singles from Curezum so far have been set up like a real Cure single, with a more popular song (One Hundred Years and A Forest) as the A-side, while the B-sides have been lesser known songs (The Top and Siamese Twins). Featuring a much slower approach that A Forest, Siamese Twins is an absolutely perfect cover. Its doomy approach adds to the heaviness of the lyrics (“Leave me to die/You won’t remember my voice/I walked away and grew old/You never talk/We never smile/I scream/You’re nothing/I don’t need you any more/You’re nothing”). The middle section has a really nice blast beat (courtesy of Eight Bells drummer, Christopher Van Huffel) fueled fast part that adds a brutal touch to the song and sounds intense when put against the slower parts of the rest of the song. The cover is a midpaced headbanger and I’m sure will be a huge staple of any live shows Curezum plays. Songs from Pornography are pretty metal friendly as the album is really harsh (compared to everything else in The Cure’s discography) and bleak, but Curezum just takes it to a whole new level. The vocals (by perfectly and mysteriously named Robert Vikernes) are especially fitting on Siamese Twins and makes it sound wonderfully evil.
Each song on the single features a guest appearance, Matron Thorn of Ævangelist playing lead guitar on A Forest and the aforementioned Christopher Van Huffel of Eight Bells. If you’re a Cure fan and a metal fan, do not skip on this. It builds on what Curezum did with their first single and just makes it better. I can’t wait to hear what they do with their full length down the line.  I know it will be incredible. Curezum are doing exceptional things, and in the long run, hopefully turning people on to The Cure.

You can pick up the A Forest/Siamese Twins Single from the Static Tension Records Bandcamp page HERE! There is a digital download and a pretty awesome physical package that includes a shirt, cassette single, three pack buttons, a signed postcard, and trading card for a very cheap $20. Limited to 50 so grab one quick!